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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
on who is taking part in the ceremony. a civil rights legacy lives on. stay with us. [ female announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day 50+. >>> in less than two weeks, roberts will swear in president obama for his second term in office. as many as 800,000 visitors will be in washington for the inauguration. and crews are hard at work for the inaugural platform outside the capitol. it's a big day and the president set a big agenda to match it. he plans to tackle immigration, gun control, climate change, and tax reform in his second term. and with four years in office under his belt, this president knows what he wants and he's confident he'll get it. joining me now is democratic strategist margie omero and victoria defrancesco soto, a fellow at the university of texas and an msnbc contributor. thank you both for joining me tonight. >> thanks, rev. >> victoria, how does the president keep the momentu
rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, that is what's so speci
with affirmative action, and at the time, as you may have read and not remember, the civil rights movement, martin luther king turned to full employment and poor people's campaign as the principal demand, and the johnson administration rather than coming up with full employment we spotted with affirmative action. you won't see look at the eyes on the prize or marching in the street demanding affirmative action. they were demanding full employment and trying to reach out to whites, latinos, asians, native americans, that was the vision. and she said when affirmative action happened, we knew it would only help the upper-middle-class within the black community, a very small percentage of african-americans, kids who want to go to these elite colleges, you know, that affirmative action was targeted or would benefit from. but we were scared of being read beaded and ostracized or attack so we backed down and just accepted that. he said we knew the poverty would remain in these basic issues of economic injustice would be made. i say this to say that movements can be the railed. they can be intimidated, th
that really limited the due process rights in civil commitments, and really look at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so it's kind of an ongoing project, and is in a host of different context, another talk by specific context, but this people, people civilly committed for mental because of mental illness. and there are a range of issues that the aclu has been working on with partner groups to actually address and raise the due process concerns about civil commitment. >> can you explain something about the philosophy behind incarceration, and why, what is the idea behind isolating a person so acutely? >> so, aside from the campaign to end overincarceration, the aclu likes of the campaigns, but another one is a campaign to stop the use of solitary or at least significantly curb its use. we've been very active the last several years litigating to prevent long-term isolation and to create benchmarks programs, access to se
, one that isn't based on a weapon. also, in the south i remember reading during the civil rights period where they were hosing people down with water and the water also had a lethal impact. so i am just saying that these weapons sound, well we are not using a gun or actual bullets. but it does not actually necessarily, i am not convinced that it necessarily always takes away the lethal aspect. and i think that we have plenty of examples where people of color and low income working people have particularly been victimized by that and there was even that incident here at the theatre where that young man was brandishing another little, i don't know, he was not brandishing a gun was killed. so, i'm just afraid that if then, the option comes to you as a taser that that is where the people will go automatically. instead of having like you said, the slow down, think more. whatever. i'm not, you know, and since tasers do have a lethal, there is a possibility of that and i'm just not... i just wish that the conversation were really different here. >> i agree, i don't disagree with what you are s
in the 1700's which nobody would have ever predicted would end slavery 100 years later. the civil rights movement ups and downs. i think that it is important to always know that social movements are not simple narrative of arcs of one of success after another. it is not about occupying space. it is about confronting the enormous challenges we face in america and the globe. if we do not confront of these changes, we will not have a future. one way of thinking about maybe the history of the abs and a -- ebbs and flows of social movement is to say -- for those who write the demise of this movement, which there is always a gap or you can have hope. that is the importance of the beginning of the occupy movement. it actually is a source of hope that people responded to the changes in this country that really show that there are cracks that can be exploited. and i will stop. thank you. >> ok. >> nadine. >> she actually took my answer. [laughter] that's what i was going to say. so, there is some good overlap. i guess i will talk a bit about my experience with occupy and start off with a general
which nobody would have ever predicted would end slavery 100 years later. the civil rights movement sought ups and downs. i think that it is important to always know that social movements are not simple narrative of parks of one of success after another. -- arcs of success after another. it is not about occupying space. it is about confronting the enormous challenges we face in america and the globe. if we do not confront of these changes, we will not have a future. one way of thinking about maybe the history of the abs and a flows of social movement is to say -- for those who write the demise of this movement, which there is is always a gap or you can have hope. that is the importance of the beginning of the occupy movement. it actually is a source of hope that people responded to the changes in this country that really show that there are cracks that can be exploited. and i will stop. thank you. >> ok. >> she actually took my answer. [laughter] that's what i was going to say. so, there is some good overlap. i guess i will talk a bit about my experience with occupy and start off wi
's support of african american entrepreneurship, civil rights and political involvement began before 1958 when he took ownership of the bar and remained constant until his death in 2003. his influence extended far beyond the neighborhood to include the larger sphere of san francisco. in 1963, jordan became the first african american to campaign for mayor of san francisco, running on a progressive platform of social justice and racial equality. the bar was a centerpiece of jordan's neighborhood community building activities and he reviedd in the upstairs unit for nearly 50 years. jordan was known locally as the mayor of butcher town, which was the historic name for the area immediately surrounding the bar. his efforts to establish a place of community and legacy within the bayview area continues for which he is known to this day. the bar continues to be operated by the jordan family, who are here today, who support the land mark designation. this concludes my presentation, if you have any questions. >> thank you. supervisor cohen? >> i think that's it. >> let's open this up for publi
better to look at your property today, have it inspected, and make the changes because this is a civil rights statute. it is the same thing as discrimination based on race, and it is treated the same way in the courts. >> i heard the previous speaker make some good points about be a pro are the -- proactive about getting a task inspector before you get sued. i am f. task inspector. if you have to cut -- heard the term thrown around, inspection created by our state senators, and it is really great information out there that i want to encourage everyone. i will not be able to go into extensive details, but i will be able to tell you a little bit of what is involved. the difference is in the california building code. i can also give you tips on how to choose and specter appeared first of all, the program has an inspector's knowledge of the california building code, and the reason why that is so important is because you have to comply with both. the california billing code is enforced when you get a building permit, and forced by the local building requirements. it says all new buildings h
and thank you even for being your civil rights attorney and you are still representing people in need and i appreciate that. i know angela represents again the kind of contributions the italian community has made to our great city and continues to make and i am here to tonight to wish you a great year of italian culture but to kick start it. it was really just a few months ago that the ambassador ofity italy came through and talk about this wonderful thing they were to do to celebrate year of italian culture but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to sa
or the anti-gun control movement -- >> the civil rights movement -- >> the civil rights movement. >> the suffragte movement, women's rits, you'veot to be organized. >> absolutely. you've got to be organized. and what we see, remember that 16% i identified as the alarmed? again people who are very concerned and think this is an urgent problem, but they feel relatively isolated and alone. they say, "i feel this way, some of my friends and family feel this strongly." but they have no sense that they're part of over 40 million americans that feel just as strongly as they do. they've never been properly organized, mobilized and directed to demand change. and i mean, that's what the political system ultimately responds to. if you basally have a vacuum of people who are demanding change, and i don't mean that truly. i mean, there are of course many great organizations that have been advocating for change for a long time. but it hasn't been a broad based citizens movement demanding change. in that situation a relatively small but well-funded and vocal community that says no can absolutel
of that population being impacted. and the aclu is also concerned with the civil rights implications that the supervisors spoke of today. you know, across the nation and in san francisco, you will see the african american communities of color are impacted by accessive use of force that would lead us to believe that once they are instituted they would also be disproportionately used against the xhupts of color. because they are easy to use it will increase over use and officers will be use it as the first line rather than reverting to what they used in training such as verbal commands and we also have outlined many incidents of litigation that have occurred... >> just some follow up questions. did you ever get a response from the mayor on your letter? >> no, we did not. >> and any of the staff in >> no. >> i think that the letter was actually really well done and it is well documented and there are a number of citations in here, do you recall what i read to commander ali, right now, referencing how it looks to be when tasers are involved in working with people who have mental health i
movement, the civil rights movement, and, you know, things were happening, boys and girls. harvey's election i think made people take notice. i think that george's, george's proclivities were always in and around social justice. i know that he was raised catholic. so was i. 16 years of catholic school has made me the man i am today. [laughter] >> and harvey influenced by jewish culture, you know, i don't think it's ever been explored enough. but if you talk to every brit, you know that harvey was a very, very much impacted by the holocaust. you know, if you remember, it happened in the '40s. it's only 20 years or so since he came onto the scene. and i think he was able to transfer, you know, that tragedy and that oppression into what was happening with gay people. he was very scrappy. i wanted to acknowledge two people who were very supportive of harvey milk and george moscone, and both of them have left us and that's howard wallace and hank wilson. (applause) >> what i loved about them was, what i loved about them was they knocked back a few and really get into it with harvey abo
who she is and why you think she's such a good pick. >> she was formerly the wife of the slain civil rights leader medger everies in jackson mississippi, in front of his wife and children, by a back-shooting coward by the name of byron beckwith. she pursued the case for 30 years and got a brave attorney to take her case. it was made into movie called " "ghosts of mississippi." she has been a stalwart, stubborn, wonderful lady who dedicated herself to getting justice for her husband and finally got it. and remarkably this is the first time a non-clergymen or non-clergy person has been allowed to give the invocation at a presidential inaugural. i think it's terrific. i think it to put her in the spotlight is a great thing. >> jennifer: well, i think it is a great symbol as well, and i appreciate, as always, your insights, and you are one of our favorite columnists, so thank you, charlie for sharing with us. charlie pierce of "esquire" magazine. health insurance companies were given an inch. now they're taking a whole yard. they just cannot seem to help themselves. we'll hear about that
-- no it is a right for god's sake. >> stephanie: right. i think that's what has made this civil right's movement go so much faster. is because of that. >> caller: right. >> stephanie: and i'm also -- was a practicing catholic. i got so good i went professional, so i don't practice anymore. but i never thought about it. >> caller: yeah, see my attitude was always that god doesn't have any discretion of who he loves. so that wasn't it but it was like, oh you know, no. and now i'm like my god what happened? when the president did it made it a universal thing. >> stephanie: i think chuck hagel is generally a good guy, and i think at that time all around the world there was still a lot of homophobia. the way it sounds now, we go that's really homophobic. >> caller: yep. i love you guys. and i get up early in the morning so i'm watching you guys early. >> stephanie: yay! she's precious. [ applause ] >> stephanie: here is a story that will make you feel better whether you are gay or straight -- [♪ "world news tonight" theme ♪] >> stephanie: oregon man arrested for choking his girlfr
. maybe that labor is a spent force. it may be that civil rights organizations are spent forces. maybe that community-based organizations are now reminded into anxious to just get up foundation grant or a government no income tax credit to build five units of housing, and that is not going to change the system. but that is where people are. and that is where i start. for the last four years, i have been working with the widest, most conservative part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try to get young black and latino kids of color into the building trades so they can become the green work force of the future. the building trades, spent as they are, conservative as they are, operate 1200 job training centers in the construction trades and it is the second-largest job-training mechanism outside of the u.s. navy. and guess what? they are actually in a coalition with youth build, with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts, inner-city kids, working together for the last four years to say, how do we change? how do we improve? the national leadership o
that standard going to be and how are going to test people in a way that complies with the civil rights but, of course, has the overriding effect of addressing public safety. we had a lot of testimony. we had a lot of speaking out pro and con for law enforcement throughout the campaign in colorado. about public safety implications and whether moving toward legalization was better or worse than the status quo. i appreciate your point that i would tell you i suppose worked a lot on my own career in law enforcement and prosecution, there's disagreement. i've heard passionate disagreement from a lot of people i respect. one thing we have to do now is come up with a standard that will protect people who come and visit our state and drive on the roads so that people know that there is going to be a safe system for them. and we're not sure yet how to do that to our legislature has this as job one that starts this next week in colorado. i think your point of view, your input would be really valuable in our state. >> you are against legalization and colorado, is that right? >> yesterday i was suppos
free to use normative value-based considerations in making decisions about civil commitment. >> professor. >> i'm going to add, do this a little bit shorter, i think, which is let's start with a question to everybody in the audience. all right, so if you like chocolate cake, raise your left hand. if you do not like chocolate cake, raise your right hand. all people who like chocolate cake left hand, don't like chocolate cake right hand. all right, hands down. how many people found it difficult to raise your hand by yourself? not very many. great, you made a choice. you thought about it. you decided and you acted. and my concept of what free will is the ability to act consistent with your preferences and desires. just that simple. now how many people here feel like you have control over whether or not you like chocolate cake? raise either hands. fewer, right. so there are two different things going on that we often conflate when we talk about free will. one is your predispositions to preferences and desires, ok. that may be impulsivity, that may be violence, that may be anti-s
get accused when i get you guys on of talking over you, of being rude. i'm trying to be civil. you have got to try and answer some of the questions, right? here is my issue for you. why do people need, civilians need an ar-15 type assault weapon? >> i said statistically, they're using in a low amount of crimes. that's an fbi act. >> but they have been used in the last three mass shootings. >> because they advertise in the media. everybody knows if someone jumps off the empire state building, they put security out there because there are copy cats. go commit suicide by killing a bunch of kids and use this because this is what the army uses. >> why do they need them? >> to protect us. a study shows they killed 290,000 people. google it. >> should everyone in america have an ar-15 if they want one? >> statistically, where there's more guns, there's lower crime. >> the 23 richest countries, you have -- >> america was born on guns and whiskey. it's true we're a violent society. >> right. america has the most guns -- >> have you seen the fbi numbers? knives, bats, rocks, kill many, many
on the same but we put them on it and you're probably in the next genraition of those radios right now and by the way -- there was a man here who preceded the mayor. it was then called the chief administrative officer and rudy rothenberg and incredible civil servant and
kinds of laws we can pass that will aid in that effort right after the shooting my family and i established the fund. we call it the fund for civility, respect, and understanding. we focused the last two years on addressing bullying in school, which we know has a link to mental health concerns and violence. we're working on mental health, but also at the beginning i want to focus more and more on the issue of background checks, and the availability of large capacity magazines. you know, many tucson where we were shot two years ago today, the young man who shot us -- the young man who shot us had a magazine with 30 bullets in it. he had another one in his pocket, and two more smaller magazines. in 45 seconds or less 19 people were down and nine of them died. we really have to address not only the mental health aspect of this issue, but the availability of that kind of high firepower weaponry. >> i know you were observing this anniversary quietly in the community and with some of the survivors. you are going to be going back, i think, to the hospital center that treated you. how a
is the right man for the job. boots on the ground combat troops land in turkey. are we one step closer to being drawn into the serious civil war that story next. another obama ultimatum. the imperious president unrelenting in his spending plans and habits. >> one thing i will not compromise over is whether or not congress should pay the tab for a bill that have already racked up. congress refuses to give the as is the ability to pay bills on time, the consequences for the entire global economy to be catastrophic. >> the president does not want congress to slow down his free-spending ways. former cbo director douglas will seek an joins us next. ♪ ♪ lou: joining me now, former director of the congressional budget office, president of the american action form, but this will secant joining us tonight from washington d.c. good to have you with this. we have hit the debt ceiling, so says the treasury secretary. i'm not sure where we are. is that right? every actually hit it? is the treasury secretary's speaking metaphorically in some way? >> well, running close to the limit and then the secretary
since the republicans lost in november, the parties appeared to be in kind of a civil war and donors are zipping their wallets because these don't like the party's direction. yet the tea party wing wants to push the party further right in some cases. what's going on with the republican party? we've got an expert. the former house republican majority leader and former freedom works chairman dick armey. mr. armey, i'm a hill rat and i always look up to guys that have been elected. i'm going to ask you broad questions, we'll narrow it down to freedom works later on. what's going on with your party? i thought in that first debate romney had the number on the president. he's talking about spending, creating jobs, sticking to economics. he looked like he had a winning line and then he went to benghazi and rape and rotten apple stuff. why wasn't your party what it should have been this year? >> obviously there are a lot of foolish mistakes and that 48% of the american people thing that he did. most of the mistake were mistakes made by candidates on the campaign trail. what the party is stru
admitted that he traveled to libya several times during the civil war but has denied any connection to the benghazi attacks. so right now nobody in custody that we know for sure was involved in that attack. frustrating for u.s. officials. >> so is he still being held? >> not clear whether he's still being held. right now it looks like there's nobody in custody that we're sure was involved at least as a suspect in that attack and it's very frustrating. >> a lot of work to bring those folks to justice. brian, thanks very much. >>> lawmakers here in washington want to hear from the secretary of state hillary clinton as soon as possible about the benghazi attack. we're just learning she will now testify on capitol hill the week of january 21st. her testimony had to be rescheduled after her bout with a stomach virus, a concussion, and later a blood clot in her head. let's bring in elise labott. >> wolf, it will be the week of january 21st. president obama's inauguration is on the 20th. it may not be exactly the same day after the inauguration. the committee staffers on the senate foreign
not be victims right now if the school district had simply followed the law? >> without a doubt. >> no doubt in my mind. >> bob allard are bay area attorneys separately representing alleged victims in civil caseses against evergreen and chandler. we showed them what we uncovered. >> had they paid attention to that, we wouldn't be sitting here today. >> reporter: the principal testified in her trial she reported the alleged abuse to the district, namely human resources director carol schmidt and was told to handle it on her own. schmidt then testified she had not received any training on how to handle child sexual abuse in 17 years. but according to the district schmidt is the title 9 coordinator. >> in this instance the information was conveyed to a title 9 coordinator and the appropriate action was not taken, far from it. >> reporter: a tigtle 9 coordinator with no training and no knowledge how to process these serious allegations, plus, her contact information wasn't published online. that is until we told them about the requirement. the website is now updated to include contact informatio
crowd? it's almost like the civil war went the other way, and the south somehow took over the party of lincoln, not that there's anything wrong with the south, but it's certainly made your party into a right wingish party. >> well, we're not going to be a national party of social conservatives basically destroyed any possibility of people in the northeast from getting elected who are republicans. it's just not going to happen. it's not the fiscal side that's of concern to people up north. it's their social agenda, which has nothing to do with running the country. >> did you ever read the republican platform this year? you ran for office this year. did you take a look at some of the stuff in there about outright -- >> chris, you know that no congressman ever has read the platform whether they're conservative or liberal. it's the most irrelevant document, but ultimately it can hurt some people who, you know, when others read it. it doesn't tell us how to vote. it's useless. >> i read it once in a while with great pleasure because it's so absurd. it is. howard fineman, i don't know who
of the 90 than it is to get 51% out of the 10. and i just, i would short your efforts right now, john. >> well i think it's a real struggle. but i don't think it's one we can give up on. because it's a huge -- i think it's the future of western civilization. these policies we're implementing today don't work. they've been proven to fail in history. countries have fallen over and over again -- >> there have been periods like this before, john? we've never had this many people on the receiving end of government in the united states. >> not in the united states. >> no. >> but i think, i do think that the republicans need a real message that's a more libertarian message. it's hard to know whether obama won over economics or whether he won over social policies. >> that everybody gets to use their own -- >> there's a lot of -- >> i understand. >> simpson bowles, alan simpson and erskine bowles, bipartisan group, they have been trying like mad to get people to pay attention to this message. they're out against today. they're going to have another time-out and the fiscal message, the bipartis
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)